Nasty Comments & Crazy People

 

       I would say that this must be the week of the crazies but honestly I seem to draw a fair amount of them most of the time. Usually the nasty comments are mostly on Twitter but it seems they’ve migrated to my blog. Damn it Yay! 

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Wondering why you haven’t seen them? BAN HAMMERED those bastards I don’t approve nasty comments. If you just disagree with me on a book or a subject I won’t censor your comment but if it’s advocating violence or you cussing me out….yeah, I’m probably not going to let it post. 

           I got one the other day on my post about Oklahoma Turnpikes from forever ago (way to creep my page weirdo) that called me a bitch and told me if I didn’t like how things worked I should start ‘slaughtering politicians’…… Uhm…. holy shit this guy has lost his fucking mind Wow that guy is unhinged. I do not now or ever suggest that anyone “slaughters” anyone else….ever. He went from 0 to ape shit immediately.  Calm the heck down bro! Take a chill pill ( do people still say that?). I’d rather just vote out politicians whose policies I don’t agree with. Killing them is a bit harsh…I mean…if I killed every person I didn’t agree with….there wouldn’t be many people left. Plus, I’m a lover not a fighter. Peace is an actual solution people. Oh, and as of now, I’m still legally allowed to complain when politicians do stuff I don’t like. So, I think I’ll raise my voice and not a weapon because murder is a big fucking deal and I’m not about to take someone’s life over the dollar or so I have to pay to drive on a road. I mean, get perspective. 

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As if that wasn’t crazy enough, I’ve received about 20 emails from some guy pervert  asking me to review his graphic erotic novel……NO means NO fella. Just….read my damn review policy and these types of crazy situations won’t happen. When I said no he got his panties in a bunch upset and said it’s my fault his book can’t get any reviews…..dude, I’m not responsible for what other reviewers are telling you. 

To top all of that off, when I was mowing my backyard yesterday a rabid probably rabies infested tiny mouse ran up my BARE LEG till he got to the edge of my shorts and ran back down and away. So, I’m probably going to die thankful he didn’t decide inside my shorts looked like a path he wanted to take. 

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Oh, and I found a dead mole on my doorstep this morning. So, yeah. Good times.

 

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Books That Matter

As a parent, one of my main goals is to raise my kids to care. Not just care, but care deeply. I want my kids to see other’s suffering and genuinely want to change it. I am doing my best to contribute to a generation that has the skills (emotional, educational & physical) to face the trails headed their way. Trials like deep inequality, rampant homelessness, lack of adequate food, clothing, health care and sadly the repercussions of perpetual war. I want my kids to feel empowered to make changes. A good way to do that is to give them a deep understanding of each issue. Books are a great tool to achieve this.

Malala Yousafzai Quote

    When I was growing up war was just the way things were. No one took the time to explain to me that there were other ways to handle attacks from other countries. I remember sitting in my classroom in middle school as the Twin Towers were hit by those planes. We watched the people jumping from the buildings on our tiny bulbous screen hung in the top corner of our classroom. About the time my teacher realized that people were jumping to their death in front of a class of children she turned the TV off. 

Another teacher came into my class and the two of them angrily discussed blowing those terrorists to smithereens. My classmates heatedly discussed how America would kill them all. In middle school…the KIDS went straight to death. There was no talk of any other way to handle the attack. I remember sitting and looking at all that anger and hate and all I could feel was devastation at the choice those people jumping had been forced to make. My mind reeled with the horror I knew was coming to the country responsible. I knew in a round about kind of way what happens in wars. I knew because every chance I had I was reading story after story about anything and everything. I cared because from a very young age my brain was used to thinking from anothers perspective.

I want my kids to think diplomatically and find solutions other than to kill everyone. I want my kids to understand that a handful of people from a country do not represent an entire populace. I want my kids to find solutions to complicated issues.

Einstein Quote about peace

  One way to do that is to read them or have them read stories that illustrate the consequences of war and poverty. I recently stumbled upon the “Through My Eyes” series while browsing books in my local library. At 20 months and 4 years my kids are still too young to read these but you can bet I will introduce them later. I suggest you read through them and introduce them to your kids when appropriate. 

Naveed CoverThe explosion jolts him awake. He sits up, gasping for air, heart thumping.

Was the blast real? Perhaps it had only happened in his head, a bad dream. Demons of the dark, his father had called them. ‘Push them away. They’ll only poison your thoughts. Seek the light and they can’t hurt you.’

Naveed is sick of war – of the foreign powers and the Taliban, the warlords and the drug barons that together have torn Afghanistan apart. He’s had to grow up quickly to take care of his widowed mother and little sister, making what little money he can doing odd jobs and selling at the markets. When he adopts Nasera, a street dog with extraordinary abilities, he has a chance to help rebuild his country. But will a new friend’s betrayal crush his dreams of peace forever?

Amina CoverAmina lives on the edges of Mogadishu. Her family’s house has been damaged in Somalia’s long civil war, but they continue to live there, reluctant to leave their home. Amina’s world is shattered when government forces come to arrest her father because his art has been officially censored, deemed too political. Then rebel forces kidnap Amina’s brother, forcing him to become a soldier in Somalia’s brutal ongoing war.

Although her mother and grandmother are still with her, Amina feels vulnerable and abandoned. Secretly, she begins to create her own artwork in the streets and the derelict buildings to give herself a sense of hope and to let out the burden of her heart. Her artwork explodes into Mogadishu’s underground world, providing a voice for people all over the city who hope for a better, more secure future.

 

Shahana Cover‘Open your eyes. We will not hurt you.’
The boy quietens; his eyes open.
‘Where are you from?’
The boy stares at them both; then says, ‘Who will you tell?’

Shahana lives alone with her young brother in the shadow of the Line of Control, the border patrolled by Pakistani and Indian soldiers that divides Kashmir in two. Life is hard, but Shahana ekes out a living with her beautiful embroidery. Then she finds a boy lying unconscious near the border. Zahid is from across the Line of Control, and Shahana takes a terrible risk by sheltering him. But how can she give Zahid up to the authorities when she knows he’ll be imprisoned – or worse?

An unforgettable novel about one young girl in war-torn Kashmir.

Emilio CoverFor high-school student Emilio Garcia Lopez, it’s an ordinary school day. But that evening the knock on the door announcing the arrival of his police officer cousin Juanita, flanked by a tall man in the uniform of the Federal Police, will turn his ordinary day into the beginning of a long nightmare. Emilio’s mother has been kidnapped in broad daylight from a hotel car park by unidentified criminals, who appear to know a great deal about her business and who have mistaken her for a wealthy businesswoman. An action-packed story set in a contemporary conflict zone.

 

 

Malini CoverMalini lives with her parents and young sister, Banni, in northern Sri Lanka. As the civil war heads towards its catastrophic end, Malini and her family are herded by Tamil Tiger troops towards the coast where they and thousands of other Tamil civilians will act as human shields. When Malini’s father pushes a phone into her hands and tells her to run off into the forest with Banni, Malini does as she is told. But then the shelling begins, and Malini has no way of finding her mother and father. With the role of parent thrust upon her, Malini has no choice but to travel to her grandfather’s village a long way inland. She and Banni will need to keep off the highways and stay alert for soldiers. But where will the next meal come from? Who can they trust? Where will they shelter? And will they ever be reunited with their parents again?

Zafir CoverZafir has a comfortable life in Homs, Syria, until his father, a doctor, is arrested for helping a protester who was campaigning for revolution. While his mother heads to Damascus to try to find out where his father is being held, Zafir stays with his grandmother – until her house is bombed. With his father in prison, his mother absent, his grandmother ill and not a friend left in the city, Zafir must stay with his Uncle Ghazi. But that too becomes dangerous as the city becomes more and more besieged. Will Zafir survive long enough to be reunited with his parents?

Dystopian Novel Societies & Their Impact

Dystopian novels are super popular and I know I’m not the only one who has given serious thought to how crappy existing in one of those societies would be. Dystopian novels burrow deep into our psych and give us way more than just entertainment. This genre has a power that most others just don’t. Novels like “The Handmaid’s Tale” influence politics and it’s symbols have been used in many a protest in an effort to protect women’s rights. Novels with that kind of power tend to find themselves quickly thrown into the “banned book” pile with lots of outrage on both sides of the aisle. There’s been so much outrage regarding this particular book that it’s found itself on the 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books list for 20 years. At my tiny high school in Oklahoma we most certainly didn’t read it. I read it on my own and it was eye opening. I’ve since read it at least 30 times and it hits me just as hard as the first time, every time.

The Handmaids Tale Cover

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I think what is most haunting about “The Handmaid’s Tale” is that Atwood wrote only about restrictions that have actually happened in real life. Most of the time books that are based off truth make me very nervous but what really gets my cogs turning is the books that speculate. Books like “Life As We Knew It” or “The Last Orphans” open a window of possibilities. The scenarios in both of these books are completely out of the blue and throw the world into chaos. It’s those scenarios that scare me the most. There is no where far enough to run in these worlds. “The 5th Wave” is another one that leaves me shaken.

I’m thankful for the freedom that remains in fiction and it’s ability to bring to life every scenario possible. I would like to see these writers given more credit for the depth of influence their writing has. Seeing the extreme consequences of an action either by a government or a natural disaster gives us the ability to see the ripples possible with every decision we make as a populace. There is no price tag on preparedness. 

Another thing to consider is how dystopian writers explore ethics of science and religion. It’s like the saying “just because we can doesn’t mean we should”. I know with the rise of CHRISPR and even when stem cells were beginning to be used, religious leaders were and are in a bit of an uproar. I’m not against either of these but I’ve seen a lot of people throw one heck of a fit about it. From what I’ve seen personally, I think a lot of the anger has more to do with a lack of understanding then anything else. While I know that the US public school system struggles to fund even the most basic of an education…. I am thankful that books and movies help bridge that gap some. The real solve for this issue is a better education and I feel that superstition will fade with better understanding. In the meantime, I would like to see books and movies come even closer to actual science and explore further. 

While on the subject of ethics, I’d like to bring up how dystopian novels also breed enormous amounts of empathy. One book, “The Dean Machine” flips the script on puppy mills. Instead of dogs, the appalling conditions are experienced by humanity. Dylan Lee Peters dives deep in his book and it’s one of the most eye opening and disturbing things I’ve ever read. It also made me take a deep look at society and it’s treatment of animals in general. Author’s have a lot of power in this regard. They literally help shape public opinion and can make real changes with the power of their words. 

What are some dystopian stories you’ve read that shook you? 

Check out the books mentioned in this article below!

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I guess I always felt even if the world came to an end, McDonald’s still would be open.

High school sophomore Miranda’s disbelief turns to fear in a split second when an asteroid knocks the moon closer to Earth, like “one marble hits another.” The result is catastrophic. How can her family prepare for the future when worldwide tsunamis are wiping out the coasts, earthquakes are rocking the continents, and volcanic ash is blocking out the sun? As August turns dark and wintery in northeastern Pennsylvania, Miranda, her two brothers, and their mother retreat to the unexpected safe haven of their sunroom, where they subsist on stockpiled food and limited water in the warmth of a wood-burning stove.

Told in a year’s worth of journal entries, this heart-pounding story chronicles Miranda’s struggle to hold on to the most important resource of all—hope—in an increasingly desperate and unfamiliar world. An extraordinary series debut!

Susan Beth Pfeffer has written several companion novels to Life As We Knew It, including The Dead and the Gone, This World We Live In, and The Shade of the Moon.

The Last Orphans Cover

 

One horrifying day will change the life of sixteen-year-old Shane Tucker and every other kid in the world. 

In a span of mere hours, the entire adult population is decimated, leaving their children behind to fend for themselves and deal with the horrific aftermath of the freak occurrence. As one of the newly made elders in his small town, Shane finds himself taking on the role of caretaker for a large group of juvenile survivors. One who just happens to be Kelly Douglas—an out-of-his-league classmate—who, on any other day, would have never given Shane a second glance. 

Together, they begin their quest to find out why all of the adults were slaughtered. What they find is even more horrifying than anything they could have expected—the annihilation of the adults was only the beginning. Shane and his friends are not the unlucky survivors left to inherit this new, messed-up planet. No, they are its next victims. There is an unknown power out there, and it won’t stop until every person in the world is dead. 

the-5th-wave    After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it’s the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth’s last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie’s only hope for rescuing her brother–or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.

 

The Dean Machine Cover  Meet Dan Delacor, an utterly boring citizen of Yellow City. Every day he puts on his yellow shoes, yellow shirt, yellow pants, and yellow tie, and catches a ride on the Tunnel Runner from the suburbs into downtown. He has a job, a home, and a girlfriend, and he never wonders what waits beyond the giant glass wall that surrounds Yellow City.
Except… Dan isn’t as boring as he seems. He often wonders why everything in Yellow City has to be yellow. He wonders why he suffers frequent anxiety attacks, and why he can’t help himself from strolling through dangerous neighborhoods, or running wildly through the fields that separate downtown from the suburbs. Mostly though, Dan wonders why he can’t remember how he lost his right arm, or anything that happened before five years ago.
So, when Dan’s mundane yellow world is interrupted with the seemingly impossible presence of a little red dog named Dean, he quickly finds out there are answers to his questions, and that everything he knows is a lie.
Follow Dan as he learns the secrets of his true identity, the scope of the world beyond the wall, and the true intentions of Yellow City’s mysterious leader, Chancellor Elgrey Vinsidian. Meet Wendy, the twelve-year-old girl on a rescue mission, Echo Valkzdokker, the woman with a love for danger, James Perkins, the wily pilot who has a way with words, and Bianna Kensington, the cold-mannered rebel with a cause. Look through the cracks of this new world with Dan as he learns why his little friend is nicknamed The Dean Machine, what special bond they share, and why the dog deserves a legacy that should live on forever.

He lives to love.
He would die to protect.
His heart is a machine.

Indie Author Spotlight – Tracey Brame

Originally from Indianapolis, Tracey Brame graduated from the US Military Academy at West Point with a degree in political science. Since then, she has earned dual masters degrees from the Kelley School of Business and the Thunderbird School of Global Management. She is the owner of West Point Financing, an equipment leasing company, and has devoted her life to exposing the modern, coercive methods of white supremacists in the United States.

Tracey Brame Author Pic

The Interview

Q: “Undeterred” was a real eye opener for me as I read. What are your hopes for the book? 

I hope every American regardless of political affiliation  reads the book to understand that the tactics of the modern Ku Klux Klan being carried out against modern citizens under the nose of society. I hope women read it twice since they are the greatest target.

 

Q: Since the release, has anyone attempted to contact you or threaten you about what you’ve written?

Not yet. There is a rare chance that the KKK does not know that the book is available. I’m comfortable with my decision to write my story.

 

Q: It seemed to me that the military doctor who initially examined you after your rape was very concerned for your safety but had his hands tied on what he could do about it. Do you feel like there was more he could of done? Did Military Police do an investigation based on the doctor’s findings?

The doctor saved my military career. He false passed me which happens in the military.  Ultimately someone with PTSD will destruct upon coming out of shock. Mine was a more severe case than that doctor could have known. Had he called the Military Police I would never have graduated.  I have no hard feelings for him. He was in a tough position.

Q: In the book, you mention a number of times that you spaced out conversations and had large pieces of your encounters that went missing from memory. Do you think if PTSD was discussed more and the symptoms much more well known you would of recognized this pattern or someone close to you may of?

No. A PTSD patient cannot diagnose themselves when they have memory loss. It’s not like depression where you can see the signs. Your brain cannot access the memory. When it does you need help immediately. Some PTSD cases are more severe than others. Some people are bothered by thoughts and flashbacks, but coming out of shock can be just as dangerous as going into shock.  Someone I trusted told me to run to the veteran’s hospital. We have to convince the sufferer to seek help.

 

Q: For me, reading this book was a very emotional experience. Has writing it helped you to work through your attacks?

Yes. I wrote the book quickly, cleanly. It was like a relief to be done with it.

 

Q: I personally believe that the KKK are domestic terrorists and should be handled as such. Do you share this view?

I agree with you, but the crimes that I experienced are the work of organized criminals, so my book takes that position.

Q: With writing this book you have made very public a piece of society that many try not to recognize exists. With the rise of Trump and his cabinet, do you feel that the KKK and white supremacist movement have heightened the probability that more people will endure what you have?

I think that as long as the KKK can influence appointments and positions they create a lasting impression on agencies like the FBI which would normally oppose them by design. Literally they can create scenarios where they are or are not policing themselves. This will make it easier for them to get away with more organized crime.

 I would like to thank you for reviewing my book and taking interest in my story.

Allie- Thank you for taking a stand and exposing this very dangerous terrorist organization. I am in awe of your bravery and perseverance. 

Undeterred Cover

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Tracey Brame took an oath to serve the nation at the United States Military Academy. When she revealed an interest in entering politics during formation, a cadet violently attacked her. Brame subsequently suffered post-traumatic stress disorder and a dangerous memory loss known as dissociative amnesia, in which the victim cannot recall suffering a traumatic attack. She kept charging through her West Point duties oblivious to her condition.

After serving her commission time, Brame took a job back in her home state of Indiana. Again she expressed an interest in entering politics, and again she paid a price. The Ku Klux Klan, who did not want an educated African American woman to run for an Indiana office, targeted Brame for continued, organizational crime and harassment. She moved from Bloomington to Indianapolis, but the KKK pursuit—ordered by two grand dragons, a father/son duo, both doctors—continued.

Get ready for a gripping memoir of one woman’s perseverance over adversity.

 

Why should you read book reviews?

Why should you read book reviews?

For most of us deep in the trenches of the book world this kind of question has a pretty obvious answer. Our books are our lives and we live and breath each part of every story. We well know that each person’s reading experience is unique and having an intimate view of our favorite stories from all angles is what dreams are made of.

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There’s also a practical side to book reviews. For the prospective buyer, it’s a great way to try before you buy. Most reviewers are careful to avoid spoilers so it’s a great way to know that the book you’re buying is the book you thought it was. Summaries can be tricksy sometimes and I’ve been burned more than once by them. Like most people, I am on a tight budget and nothing makes me more angry than using my few funds to buy a book that was nothing like the summary said it would be. Ever seen the movie “Inside Out”? I look a whole lot like “Anger” as he melts the window. 

Anger inside out character

Checking Goodreads or Amazon and having the ability to read a plethora of reviews brings me all kinds of happiness. 

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Another great thing about reviews is that when you’ve read a book that hits you so hard it changes the landscape of who you thought you were you get to brag to everyone about it in your review and help a great book gets loads of attention. 

Should people get paid to write a review and if they do should you see that review as tainted?

I probably have a less than popular opinion on this because I think that paying someone to write a review is fine. I don’t see that the author of the review earning money for their work is a disqualifier for honesty. Some of the most in-depth and thought provoking reviews I’ve read have been from people paid to write them. I love when someone puts time and effort into a review to shape it into this beautiful opinion on a story that deserves it. I’ve read paid reviews of books that got horrible reviews. Turns out, those horrible reviews came from more than just that paid reviewer. Sometimes, a book sucks. Sometimes an author tries to put out a crap product that they try to pass off as great and that sucks. It really does. When I read your review of a book, I don’t care if you were paid to write it or not. I am looking for how the book moved you…or didn’t. I want to know about the book….not your income. As a reviewer, I base my opinion on the content of your reviews. That’s it. If your reviews are wildly opposite to others, my opinion of your honesty is based on that alone. 

Why is someone earning a living from their writing even an issue? I mean, there is a clear divide on it and I can’t figure why so many people are against paying someone for their abilities. Not everyone can write a great review. Not everyone has the ability to decipher meanings or explain why a book just doesn’t work. It’s not helpful to an author to get a review that just says “your book sucks”. How does it suck? What exactly has gone wrong? You want authors to turn out a great product but they need guidance like the rest of us. With the rise of the self-published movement, authors could use more back-up. I see reviewers (paid or not) as a great way to get that back-up. 

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Let’s empower writers of all kinds to come together and build great worlds with great heroes! 

 

Undeterred “KKK Witness, KKK Target” Tracey Brame

Tracey Brame took an oath to serve the nation at the United States Military Academy. When she revealed an interest in entering politics during formation, a cadet violently attacked her. Brame subsequently suffered post-traumatic stress disorder and a dangerous memory loss known as dissociative amnesia, in which the victim cannot recall suffering a traumatic attack. She kept charging through her West Point duties oblivious to her condition.

After serving her commission time, Brame took a job back in her home state of Indiana. Again she expressed an interest in entering politics, and again she paid a price. The Ku Klux Klan, who did not want an educated African American woman to run for an Indiana office, targeted Brame for continued, organizational crime and harassment. She moved from Bloomington to Indianapolis, but the KKK pursuit—ordered by two grand dragons, a father/son duo, both doctors—continued.

Get ready for a gripping memoir of one woman’s perseverance over adversity.

Undeterred Cover

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The first thing that I am going to do before I begin my review is give you fair warning. This book could be triggering to a lot of people. Before you pick it up, I’m going to give you an idea of what’s inside.

Brutal Rape

Physical Abuse

Mental Abuse

Stalking

Gaslighting 

Attempted Murder

Racism

Domestic Terrorism

Brame does not hold back and thoroughly depicts each situation in detail. This is a memoir and her story is deeply troubling and upsetting. While I fully support her endeavor to bring these issues to the fore-front of society, I want those of you who aren’t ready to face this kind of trigger to have the chance to back away.

That said, I think Brame is an incredible woman. Her bravery knows no bounds and her steel determination is awe inspiring. I am in complete awe of this woman and all she has rose above. Brame’s story is gruesome and disturbing. However, her story is one that should be told to everyone. We should all see humanity in all it’s forms.

There are parts of this book where the narration feels a bit detached but it fits well with the mindset that Brame would of experienced. It’s a chilling look into the reality of just how many cruel people there really are among us. I applaud Brame’s bravery to write and publish this book. Especially since she has endured every intimidation tactic known to man for it’s release to be prevented. I hope that those of you who know racist people stand up against them. In my mind these people deserve to be shamed. Society should stand up at every opportunity to ostracize these horrid people among us.  

Brame chronicles her repeated attacks from her ex boyfriend. His repeated attempts to destroy her life as well as his attempt to murder her are shiver inducing. A lot of women have encountered an insane man and some have not lived to tell their tale. It’s a very real and terrifying part of our society that needs to be stopped immediately. This man should never of had the opportunities to continue his torture. Something is very broken in our society.

There is one scene that I will never get out of mind. It’s the shower scene. You’ll know exactly what I’m talking about when you read it. I can’t imagine how that must of felt. This story will never leave my mind. Brame’s story will forever fire between the synapses in my brain. This story has absolutely changed my outlook. I hope it inspires change in yours.

5 stars.

5 stars

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The Technical Data:

Title: Undeterred – KKK Target, KKK Witness | Series: N/A |  Author(s): Tracey Brame  |Publisher: Amazon Digital Services / Publication Date: 6-7-2017 |Pages: 347 (Print) | ISBN:  B071G8BWC9 |Genre(s): Memoir |Language: English |Rating: 5 out of 5 |  Date Read: 5-24-2017 |Source: Copy from author.

Can Reading Make You More Empathetic?

According to Neuroscience….yes it can. I recently came across an article on “Psychology Today” that explored this very subject. I’ve often said that reading has incredible benefits to society and science backs me up on that assessment.

When I read, I’m transported to the mind of the character. I’m in the story. I’m wielding a battle axe or sipping from a chalice while surveying my kingdom. I’m running from a hit-man or twirling in my ballgown at the coronation. I am the character and the character is me. My brain learns from these characters trials and triumphs. I gain from their experiences and each life I live adds to the mix that is me.

From the article:

“Neuroscientists mapping the brain have discovered that reading fiction taps into the same brain networks as real life experience. When you are engaged in reading a fictional story your brain is literally living vicariously through the characters at a neurobiological level.”

The article also touches on the “Theory of Mind” and how even fiction improves it. If you’re not familiar with this term it’s “the ability to attribute mental states — beliefs, intents, desires, pretending,knowledge, etc. — to oneself and others and to understand that others have beliefs, desires, and intentions that are different from one’s own.”

In my own experiences, I have found that those who have came into my life as readers were typically more understanding and had a global view of the world and it’s problems while those who were not readers were more isolationist. 

In my own life, I read often to my children and will continue to do so. I hope that you will consider reading more too.

Quote credit goes to “Psychology Today”. The article I’ve referenced is below.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201412/can-reading-fictional-story-make-you-more-empathetic

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Spotlight On Romance!

Sparking Heart

Hello fellow book junkies! Today I would like to spotlight one of my favorite genres. Romance is a popular genre all around but I think people seek it out for different reasons. Some are a sucker for a good love story. Some, like me, probably love it for its reliably good endings and some of us….well, some of us are probably in it for the steamy sections. 

Romance, for me, is another way that I can live vicariously through another. That’s why I read anything. Even non-fic. I want to open my eyes as another. See worlds and people in a different light. Literature, in all its forms, helps people build a world view of events or cultures. 

The following list is a small selection of stories that I find myself re-reading for different reasons that I will highlight under each selection. Some of these books are not straight romance and that’s okay because life doesn’t fit neatly into one genre. 

The shadow Of The Lynx Cover

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 I found this book for 5 cents at a garage sale when I was only 18. The complexity of the characters is what has me going back again and again. I love how well researched this book is and the quality of the writing is amazing. Holt explores love and it’s intricacies while drawing the reader into multiple different viewpoints of the same events. When I want to get lost in another time, this is one of my favorite worlds to live in.

dan-alexander-pitcher-cover

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This is a new addition to my repertoire. I love how the characters come together and the story is multi-faceted. Dan is one of my all time favorite good ol’ boys and I found that Holly complemented him very well. 

 The Host Cover

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“The Host” is a perfect blend of sci-fi, survival and romance. I find myself going back to this story again and again due to it’s ability to squirm right into my imagination and transport me almost immediately to another life…or lives I should say. It’s authenticity is striking and it’s characters unforgettable. 

Emma Cover

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Jane Austen’s stories will now and forever hold a place in my heart but Emma, Emma will forever and always be my all time most favorite book. I first read this book when I was a younger teen and the transformation of Austen’s characters was the catalyst that changed my perception of people in all walks of life.

The Mine Cover

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This book is a bit of everything but it’s love story is special to my heart. Who doesn’t love a story where the bond between lovers transcends through time and nothing will stop the power of their love. 

I hope that you enjoyed my selections. If you’ve read any of the books I’ve listed I would love to hear your thoughts! 

That Series Tho…

I don’t know about ya’ll but there is just something about a series that grabs me. I’m not a hit it and quit it kind of girl when it comes to books. I want to take my shoes off and hang out for awhile. I want to intimately discover new worlds. Go where no woman has gone before….that kind of thing! 

Sadly, not every series is going to be the one. You know, the one that you can’t leave. Not to eat or sleep or…well anything. Your eyes are glued to the pages and your brain is firing at mach 5. The amount of injuries you have sustained from running into literally everything in your house can’t be counted. Yes, that one.

For me, series like “The Hunger Games” and “Divergent” were like this. I think I just found my new obsession.

Behold….

I’m not trying to put a bunch of pressure on my husband or anything but….I really need that third book! 

What book currently has it’s hooks in you?

Contests – Yay or Nay?

As of now AlliesOpinions only runs one contest. The Battle Of The Book Cover. The cover with the most votes gets a free book spotlight. I like the contest and enjoy seeing why people pick one cover over another but am having issues with getting people to vote.

I enjoy blog contests and regularly participate in them. I love helping well deserved authors get some attention for their books. Contests have brought amazing stories into my life.

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What say ye fair patrons of these vast interwebs? Do you like blog contests? Do you participate in them? What’s the make it or break it for you?