“When Wolf Comes” John Pappas

Historical adventure, 1801. A survivor from an attack on a trade ship is sold as a slave to the Makah tribe of the Northwest Washington Coast. In a beautiful hostile land of people with strange spiritual ways he will become teacher and student, find friendship and even love, and realize escape comes in many guises, and survival is not always as simple as saving your own life.

When Wolf Comes Cover

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“When Wolf Comes” begins with Aiden doing what he does in much of the book….deliberating on his next move. Aiden has found himself far from home and does his best to be positive while also endeavoring to be useful. When the first ship comes Aiden’s spirits lift and life takes a new path. Like life can do, the path quickly shifts again and Aiden finds himself once more a slave. This time though, maybe being a slave is a step forward.

As Aiden finds his purpose within his masters tribe and culture his eye finds itself stuck on another slave. Neveah is a beautiful native woman who also turns out to be more than what she appears. Their relationship blooms slowly and it’s a real treat to see. 

Something that should be noted is how Pappas managed to embed a message of tolerance in his story. Aiden and the Makah are very different and those differences are stark at the beginning but as the story deepens those differences don’t seem so far apart and each culture melds together to find this new direction that I found fascinating. Aiden’s culture and knowledge was accepted (albeit with suspicion) and their culture became another piece of Aiden. This story has a message of oneness that resonates even now.

“When Wolf Comes” is well researched. Time and again I found myself lost in time and imagining the beauty of the northwest. The wonder of it’s people and their means of survival. I haven’t read much into this time period or the tribes that inhabited the northwest but Pappas leads the reader expertly through the complexities of both it’s cultural and natural wonders. Pappas has a real talent for cultivating a love in his readers that has at the very least encouraged me to learn more. I imagine that sentiment will spread through each new reader.

Squintanasis was a character that I really couldn’t get enough of. I would love to see him get his own book. I felt like there was more to tell and learn from this most stoic of men. He was mysterious and wise. He was shrewd but fair. I liked him immensely. He was a big part of what made this story bury itself so deep into my psych. 

Pappas depiction of battle is gory but not overly so. The horror is addressed but not dwelt upon. The significance is put more on how the community came together and their bond. I thought it was well written and well balanced.

I could go on for days about how much I enjoyed this story. I encourage you to hop in and lose yourself in the magic of the early 1800’s.

Absolute 5 star book.

5 stars

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The Technical Data:

Title: When Wolf Comes | Series: N/A |  Author(s): John Pappas  |Publisher: Amazon Digital Services / Publication Date: 5-8-2016 |Pages: 264 (Print) | ISBN: B01FEC6YM6 |Genre(s): Historical Fiction  |Language: English |Rating: 5 out of 5 |  Date Read: 8-29-2017 |Source: Copy from author.

When Wolf Comes Cover

“The images conjured up by the Northwest Coast tribes is one of fierce people what with their dramatic masks, nose bones and complex ceremonies. This story takes you to the people beneath that image. It highlights their sense of community as well as their recognition of the changes being brought by traders. It tells of how they treat their “slaves”, their capacity for compassion and their lack of tolerance for wrongdoing.” – Amazon Reviewer

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Book Review “Lives of the Spirits” John Pappas

1801-02 on the wild Pacific Northwest Coast: At the village of Ozette, the spirits have determined that Aidan and Neveah must be exiled for six months. They are sent south to winter with the rich Chinooks near the mouth of the Colombia River and look forward to a comfortable few months together in the big lodge of Chief Comcomly. They could not have imagined the horrors awaiting them as they paddle their big canoe into the most feared curse of the times. People are dying and Aidan is seized by fear for his pregnant wife. There is only one escape–upriver. Aidan manages to put a disparate group together, including Josiah, a Virginia slave who looks too much like his famous father and who Comcomly planned to burn to rid his people of the curse. The group of 10 embark on a 200 mile odyssey up Big River to the Land of She Who Watches, into an unforgiving landscape of violence, suspicion and even friendship. They begin to feel safe, until Neveah is taken by raiders led by the most feared criminal of the region. Aidan is told the vicious Lesheen may not ransom Neveah because he likes pregnant women. To save her Aidan must face his own inner demons and immerse himself ever deeper into a spirit realm he fears. But even that doesn’t prepare him for the final shock and only path of escape. The last challenge is inevitable–he must confront the real curse maker.

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I’d like to start this review with a quote from the book that I found both hilarious and profound in its wisdom.

“Tis often that a persons mouth broke his nose”

Aiden (Irish) is a man in his early twenties but his experiences paint him as a much older soul. I loved his respect for those with different cultures. I realize that a good portion of his interest was due to survival but I also felt Aiden took on a little piece of those identities. The friendships he makes and the love that he has for Neveah aren’t based on survival. His evolution and wisdom is part of what makes this story so compelling. He saw each person as a person and did all he could to do right by them. Aiden is a grade A guy and is now one of my favorite characters. 

The banter between him and Neveah is another one of my favorite parts of this book. Their relationship is beautiful. Their friends and lovers. They are what I think of when I imagine true love. Aiden was so considerate of her feelings throughout this entire book she is the center of everything that means anything to him. Aiden loves hard and his empathy is just another part of him that brings the reader deeper into the story. 

Pappas writing is passionate and it’s clear that each of his characters are deeply loved by him. I imagine him sitting at his computer with glistening tears when Neveah is captured and all that follows. I had to wipe away my fair share of tears and I felt so close to her after that. She’s still a bit mysterious but that event brings Neveah closer to the reader.

Pappas did amazing research for this book and it’s clear he wove history and fiction as close to as real as he could get. When I read novels like this, it’s important to me that the author stays close to what that time period was really like. I want to time travel to that time with your words. I want the people to look and act like they really would have. Pappas did an outstanding job. I came away feeling like I learned a lot and that’s exactly what I wanted.

I’ve put this book on my short list for paperback purchases. I’ve got a spot on my shelf waiting. 

5 stars!

5 stars

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The Technical Data:

Title: Lives of the Spirits | Series: N/A |  Author(s): John Pappas  |Publisher: Amazon Digital Services / Publication Date: 3-6-2016 |Pages: 270 (Print) | ISBN:  B01CN3DQOI |Genre(s): Historical Fiction |Language: English |Rating: 5 out of 5 |  Date Read: 4-22-2017 |Source: Copy from author.

John Pappas Author Pic

Born in Seattle to Irish, Scotch and Greek parents, at age nine John Pappas was launched on a ten year odyssey that took him to five states and the Territory of Alaska, where he began working construction and driving a truck at age fifteen. He has been a commercial fisherman, salesman, general contractor, tech writer, script writer, video producer and property manager and has loved stories from an early age. He’s written two technical books and dozens of articles and short stories.

As a teenager in the late 50’s he saw Cape Flattery for the first time from the deck of a 40 foot salmon troller. On that day in June he fell in love with the rugged Washington Coast and has spent many happy times there in boats and walking beach trails. This lead to an interest in the region’s early times and native culture, and the discovery of many obscure stories, such as the once-thriving village of Ozette. Some time later he wrote “When Wolf Comes,” based on true events and native legend, an adventure told through the eyes of a young Irishman’s epiphanous journey toward discovery and a woman’s love.

“That Dog Will Never Hunt,” written over a decade, is a dog book like no other. Twelve very different stories with a dog theme that pulls you into the times, places and hearts of real people and their dogs in surprising ways. From humorous to serious, hunters to best friends, set in contrasting places and situations.

Now available in Kindle (PC and Mac for Kindle, mobiles) is an expanded version of the popular “Aphrodite’s Food For The Gods,” a Greek cookbook that will offer the reader a window into an ethnic past with great authentic recipes, stories and thumbnails of a few Greek gods, plus some modern examples of how Greek cooking works with the different foods available in America and other countries.

JUST PUBLISHED: “Lives of the Spirits”, the sequel to “When Wolf Comes”, is now available exclusively on Amazon. I’ve been researching the Native part for some time, but there was more I wanted in this story and it’s finally done. Journey 200 miles up wild and treacherous Big River (Columbia) with Aidan, Neveah and the son Tom Jefferson wanted to exile forever. Please see the early reviews and also check the Editorial reviews on this many faceted adventure story. (Some of my readers have had difficulty placing reviews on Amazon so at their request I’ve placed them in “Editorial Reviews” which shoppers can access on the Review page by clicking More.

All reviews of books by John Pappas are posted on his site, orca11.com or johnanthonypappas.com

Guest Post: Thirty-Eight Nooses Hung From The Crossbeams / Andrew Joyce

Andrew Joyce left high school at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until decades later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written five books, including a two-volume collection of one hundred and fifty short stories comprised of his hitching adventures called BEDTIME STORIES FOR GROWN-UPS (as yet unpublished), and his latest novel, YELLOW HAIR. He now lives aboard a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with his dog, Danny, where he is busy working on his next book, tentatively entitled, MICK REILLY.

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My name is Andrew Joyce and I write books for a living. Allie has been kind enough to allow me a little space on her blog to talk about my latest, Yellow Hair.

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Yellow Hair documents the injustices done to the Sioux Nation from their first treaty with the United States in 1805 through Wounded Knee in 1890. Every death, murder, battle, and outrage depicted actually took place—from the first to the last. The historical figures that play a role in my story were real people and I used their real names. I conjured up my protagonist only to weave together the various events conveyed in my fact-based tale of fiction. Yellow Hair is an epic tale of adventure, family, love, and hate that spans most of the 19th century. It is American history.

The inspiration for the book came to me when I was reading a short article and it made reference to the Great Sioux Uprising of 1862. It also mentioned that the outcome involved the largest mass execution in the history of the United States. That piqued my interest.

When I started my research into the incident, one thing led to another and before I knew it, I was documenting the entire history of the Sioux, who are also known as the Dakota, vis-à-vis the relationship between them and the United States.

Because the book exists only because I read the phrase, “the largest mass execution in the history of the United States,” I’ll tell you a little about that. What follows is an extremely abbreviated version of events.

The Dakota signed their first treaty with the United States in 1805 when they sold a small portion of their land to the Americans for the purpose of building forts. It was right after the Louisiana Purchase and President Jefferson wanted a presence in the West. At the time, “the West” was anything on the western side of the Mississippi River.

In the treaty of 1805, the Dakota sold 100,000 acres to the Americans. The agreed-upon price was $2.00 per acre. But when the treaty came up before the Senate for ratification, the amount was changed to two cents per acre. That was to be a precursor for all future treaties with the Americans. There were subsequent treaties in 1815, 1825, 1832, 1837, and 1851, and basically the same thing happened with all those treaties.

In 1837, the Americans wanted an additional five million acres of Dakota land. Knowing it would be a hard sell after the way they failed to live up to the letter or spirit of the previous treaties, the government brought twenty-six Dakota chiefs to Washington to show them the might and majesty that was The United States of America.

The government proposed paying one million dollars for the acreage in installments over a twenty-year period. Part of the payment was to be in the form of farm equipment, medicine, and livestock. Intimidated, the Indians signed the treaty and went home. The United States immediately laid claim to the lands—the first payment did not arrive for a year.

The significance of the 1837 treaty lies in the fact that it was the first time “traders” were allowed to lay claim to the Indians’ payments without any proof that money was owed . . . and without consulting the Indians. Monies were subtracted from the imbursements and paid directly to the traders.

By 1851, the Americans wanted to purchase all of the Dakota’s remaining lands—twenty-five million acres. The Sioux did not want to sell, but were forced to do so with threats that the army could be sent in to take the land from them at the point of a gun if they refused the American’s offer.

“If we sell our land, where will we live?” asked the Dakota chief.

“We will set aside land for the Dakota only. It is called a reservation and it will be along both banks of the Minnesota River, twenty miles wide, ten on each side and seventy miles long. It will be yours until the grasses no longer grow,” answered the Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

The Dakota were offered six cents an acre for land that was worth at least a dollar an acre. The payment would be stretched out over a twenty year period and was to be made in the form of gold coins. One year later, in 1852, the Americans took half the reservation, the seventy miles on the north side of the river. The Dakota were now reduced from a nation of fierce, independent people to a people dependent on hand-outs from the ones who stole not only their land, but also their dignity.

The Dakota were forced to buy their food from the traders who ran trading posts at the Indian Agency the U.S. Government had set up on the reservation. All year long the Dakota would charge what they needed. When the yearly payment for their land arrived, the traders would take what they said was owed them. Subsequently, there was very little gold left for the Dakota.

By 1862, the Dakota were starving. That year’s payment was months late in arriving because of the Civil War. The traders were afraid that because of the war there would be no payment that year and cut off the Dakota’s credit. The Indian Agent had the power to force the traders to release some of the food stocks, but refused when asked to do so by the Dakota.

After they had eaten their ponies and dogs, and their babies cried out in the night from hunger, the Dakota went to war against the United States of America.

They attacked the agency first and liberated the food stock from the warehouse, killing many white people who lived there. Then bands of braves set out to loot the farms in the surrounding countryside.

Many whites were killed in the ensuing weeks. However, not all of the Dakota went to war. Many stayed on the reservation and did not pick up arms against their white neighbors. Some saved the lives of white settlers. Still, over 700 hundred whites lost their lives before the rebellion was put down.

When the dust settled, all of the Dakota—including women and children, and those people who had saved settlers’ lives—were made prisoners of war.

Three hundred and ninety-six men were singled out to stand trial before a military commission. They were each tried separately in trials that lasted only minutes. In the end, three hundred and three men were sentenced to death.

Even though he was occupied with the war, President Lincoln got involved. He reviewed all three hundred and three cases and pardoned all but thirty-eight of the prisoners.

On a gray and overcast December morning in 1862, the scaffold stood high. Thirty-eight nooses hung from its crossbeams. The mechanism for springing the thirty-eight trap doors had been tested and retested until it worked perfectly. At exactly noon, a signal was given, a lever pulled, and the largest mass execution to ever take place in the United States of America became part of our history.

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Book Review “Whisper Of The Woods” D. G. Driver

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Juniper Sawfeather seems to have a talent for finding mythological creatures. Or maybe the creatures are finding her.

The mermaids she saved from the oil spill are long gone. There’s no evidence of them, and she’s been branded as a liar and a fake in the media and at school. Her environmental activist parents have moved on to a protest to save Old Growth trees from being chopped down. June isn’t particularly concerned with this cause until after falling asleep at the base of a giant tree she wakes to find herself 40 feet in the air on one of its branches!

From this point on she becomes obsessed with the tree, and it appears the tree is becoming obsessed with her too. Soon, she is trapped 170 feet above the ground, and the magical spirit that resides in the tree isn’t interested in letting her go free or allowing anyone else to save her. Is the tree spirit good or evil? Will Juniper’s feet ever touch the ground again?


This was a great sequel to “Cry Of The Sea”. Juniper has found herself entangled with yet another mythical creature/spirit. 

The woods come alive (literally) in this novel. This thousand year old tree has a mind of it’s own and has decided it likes Juniper and plans to keep her. 

The premise for this story is interesting. There are thousands upon thousands of fables about trees coming alive or people’s spirits getting trapped in a tree. It’s a fascinating and terrifying idea. Really makes you see trees in a different light.

Juniper, as always, is a bit of a brat. The story really gets going with her throwing a fit because Carter brought her to a protest on their first night back together. I think this part of her personality gives her a bit of depth. No teenager is immune to mood swings. No teenager sees the bigger picture every time. Sometimes, they’re a bit selfish. That’s real life. I like that Mrs. Driver wrote Juniper this way. Like I said, it really gives her some depth.

The descriptions of the tree are beautiful. I would love to see one of these trees for myself. How impressive and imposing a 200+ ft tree would be. 

I was happy to see Juniper and her mom come together in this book. It resolved some issues that I had from the first book. I’ll be honest, I really didn’t like June’s mom in the first book. It felt like Juniper’s parents neglected her a bit. In this book both Juniper’s mother and father are given a bit more depth and I felt like I got to know them a bit better. The story about how Juniper’s last name came about is beautiful. I literally “awe’d” out loud.

I LOVE how this story ties in with “Cry Of The Sea”. It takes the mermaid premise to a whole new plane. Including the Native American myth was perfect. It took the whole series to a whole new place. I am super excited to see where it goes. 

I look forward to continuing my journey with Juniper Sawfeather.

Definite 5 star book.

5 stars

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The Technical Data:

Title: Whisper Of The Woods | Author(s): D. G. Driver |

Publisher: Fire and Ice Young Adult Books / Publication Date: 11-21-2015 |Pages: 235 (Print) | ISBN: B017V3F53K  | Genre(s): Fantasy / Young Adult  |Language:English | Rating: 5 out of 5 |  Date Read: 2-10-2016 | Source: Copy from Author

Book Review “Cry of the Sea” D. G. Driver

 

Juniper Sawfeather is choosing which college to attend after graduation from West Olympia High School next year. She wants to go to San Diego to be far away from her environmental activist parents. They expect her to think the way they do, but having to be constantly fighting causes makes it difficult to be an average seventeen-year-old high school student. Why do her parents have to be so “out there?” Her feelings on the subject are changed when she and her father rush to the beach after a reported oil spill. As they document the damage, June discovers three humans washed up on the beach, struggling to breathe through the oil coating their skin. At first she thinks they must be surfers, but as she gets closer, she finds out that these aren’t humans at all. They’re mermaids! Now begins a complex story of intrigue, conspiracy and manipulation as June, her parents, a marine biologist and his handsome young intern, her best friend, the popular clique at school and the oil company fight over the fate of the mermaids.

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I’ll let you in on a little secret about me…..I LOVE MERMAIDS! I hope beyond all hope that some where out there they really do exist. I will straight up devour any story about mermaids. So, naturally the realistic descriptions of the mermaids in this book had me foaming at the mouth.

I liked Juniper from the beginning. Her character is very believable. Can you imagine living in the shadow of such brilliant parents? I can fully understand her desire to make her own path and try to detach her name and future from her parents. Don’t we all want to forge our own path? Don’t we all want to make our own mark on the world?

I love stories set in the northwest. I get lost in the beauty of the forests and the oceans. The author does a great job of describing what I would imagine a “native” of the area would see. I love the transformation of Juniper. She goes from wanting nothing more then to just get away from all the rain and the gloomy beaches. But, then she sees the beauty in not only her own native heritage but the beauty in the native creatures as well.

This book also brings up some serious philosophical questions as well. Would we as a species do more to protect our oceans from pollution if we believed that human like creatures resided there? Would we just brush them off as a lesser species?

All in all I loved the book. I hope beyond hope that it inspires young adults to care more about the oceans of this planet. I hope that it incites a curiosity that allows people to look at other species as something to protect and learn from. I hope this book creates a whole pile of brand new activists. And, most of all, I hope there really is a whole group of mermaids some where out there just waiting to be discovered.

This book gets the full five stars.

5 stars

 

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DID YOU KNOW: Cry of the Sea is one of the Fort Bookworm double-dips? Both Lilyn from scifi and scary and myself have reviewed it. Click HERE to see Lilyn’s review!

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The Technical Data:

Title: Cry of the Sea | Author(s): D. G. Driver |

Publisher: Melange Books / Publication Date: 2-23-2014 |Pages: 208 (paperback) |
ISBN: 9781612357867 | Genre(s): Young Adult Fantasy | Language: English |
Rating: 5 out of 5 |  Date Read: 9-23-2015 | Source: Copy From Author